Michael Bloomberg’s Obesity fight: Cure or attack?

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Lately, I have thought about the new challenges that are being fought against obesity. The moral and ethical parts can be argued by someone else; however, as a health care professional, I want to talk about the need or necessity in this matter. Starting with the idea of whether Michael Bloomberg, the mayor of New York City, is on to something by banning large soft drinks in restaurants and movie theaters (Baker 2012), with a few questions:

  1. Should Mr. Bloomberg force people on consumption?
  2. Can he do this, legally?
  3. Is this hard-line going to slow obesity?

I do not believe that anyone should become able to force such a change. Forcing a change is not going to truly address the issues of obesity. However, Mr. Bloomberg is trying to combat the issue of obesity, which has become a contributing factor in the rise of health care cost. We can all argue until we are all blue in the face that this is morally and ethically wrong, and it still is not going to change minds overnight.

Convincing a person that drinking water could help keep up their weight loss over the years, and greatly reduce the risk of many health care scares, should not become a forced argument. Which is why many doctors are arguing that obesity is a mental disorder (Caplan 2011). There are many contributing factors to obesity, and that is not going to change, until that person begin to take part.

Legally, Mr. Bloomberg cannot stop an individual from receiving a 16 oz soda and consuming refills, which are sometimes offered for free. Is he then going to force the restaurants to not serve free soda refills? For the sake of argument, let’s say that the restaurants do that, what is to keep the consumers from simply purchasing another soda? Raising the prices on cigarettes did decrease smokers, but after a while, it just leveled off and was essentially unchanged from 2004 to 2010 (CDC 2011). Will this be the same outcome with the attempts to slow the rate of obesity?

The power of fat is not going to slow, because of a law. It is not going to slow, because of public opinion. It is not going to slow, because of the lowered consumption of sodas. One cannot be willed to decrease their waste line, by either force or enticements. It has to come emotionally, mentally, spiritually, and physically from the inside out, and although Mr. Bloomberg has good intentions, it is not going to drastically decrease the rate of obesity.

References:

CDC (2011). Decrease in Smoking Prevalence — Minnesota, 1999–2010. Retrieved from  http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6005a2.htm

Caplan, Paula J. (2011). Should Obesity Be Called a Mental Illness?. Psychology Today. Retrieved from http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/science-isnt-golden/201105/should-obesity-be-called-mental-illness

Baker, Sam (2012). Bloomberg’s hard line on soft drinks has industry shook up. The Hill. Retrieved from http://thehill.com/blogs/healthwatch/nutrition/230577-bloombergs-hard-line-on-soft-drinks-has-industry-shook-up

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